Flowers

Beardless Iris

fine-art-antler-carving-beardless-irisThis type of iris plant in full bloom is called beardless because the styles of the flower lie flat upon the petals as opposed to the more common type of iris where the styles are more filamentous, or bearded. 

The iris flower is one of the more complicated to carve because of the many pieces it is composed of and the curved flowing nature of its parts. The leaves are relatively simple, but a lot of leaves are required to make the sculpture look realistic. So, this piece required considerably more work than anticipated at the beginning. Nonetheless, the sinuous curves of the stems and leaves blend into one another such that, in some lighting situations, the sculpture almost looks abstract.

With the right lighting, the piece becomes almost abstract.

With the right lighting, the piece becomes almost abstract.

Two flowering stems with auxiliary buds rise from a mass of leaves mounted on a birch base. The flowers and leaves are carved from deer, moose and elk antler.

38 cm  H x  24 cm  W x 21 cm D
14″H x  9“W x  8″D

Posted in Flowers, What's New

Ivy-covered Box

fine art antler carving, ivy-coveredThis box is made from a single piece of aged elk antler that has been sliced lengthwise, then hollowed out. The use of older elk antler allows for lines and cracks to show in the antler without reducing its strength and integrity. Because they come from a single piece, the top and bottom match so they fit together perfectly. The inside of the box is finished with beeswax giving it a honey-scented interior.

fine art antler carving, ivy-covered, vinesThe exterior of the box is adorned with ivy vines and leaves. 31 leaves and numerous vines run the length of the top and along the front of the bottom. Vines from both halves overlap the other half disguising the separation of top and bottom. Care was taken to select antler of the same yellowish color for carving the leaves.

18cm W x 7cm D x 9cm H
7”W x 3”D x 3.5”H

Orchids

abstractI try to make most of my pieces as realistic as possible. Antler is ideal for this as it lends itself very well towards intricate detail. A few pieces have delved into the abstract realm and this is one of the most abstract that I have made.

Orchids, by their nature tend to have non-traditional flower shapes, so I decided to extend their unfamiliar shapes into more abstract ones to see where the forms ceased to resemble orchids. I used three orchid types–the traditional tube orchid, the Yellow Lady-Slipper and one called the Dragon’s Mouth. I started with realistic versions of each ( 3 tube orchids, 5 lady-slippers and 3 dragon mouths), then started playing with the shapes, getting more and more abstract until it ceased to be an orchid.

lady-slipper, dragon's mouthI also carved a bunch of leaves that were used to fill in the spaces and mounted the whole works onto a base of moose antler. Altogether, about 24 flowers are in the piece, but it depends on the viewer to decide how many of them are actually flowers and which are just shapes. The piece is very complicated, with leaves and petals hidden behind other leaves and petals, then roots and seed pods thrown in. What looks like an isolated leaf turns out to be a whole flower hiding in the shadows.

 

 

The multitude of shapes are carved from deer, moose and elk antler, as well as tagua nut. The shapes are mounted onto a moose antler platform, which is itself carved and shaped. The piece is displayed upon a poplar wood base.

24 cm L x  41 cm W x  36 cm H (9.5″L x 16.6″W x 14.5″H )

 

THE ‘WOW’ FACTOR

unique, wow, sophie lovellIf you desire something unusual and special, then cruise our galleries (both sold and available) to see what our inspiration, philosophy, and creative thought has produced.

We believe our pieces can function at an art level because they address issues, explore concepts and express thoughts.

They are unique, one-of-a-kind and personal. We try to blur the line between utility and art.

We would be happy to talk with you about creating anything! We both enjoy the challenge and reward of translating your interests and lifestyle into a commissioned piece that reflects you.

“…a greater contingent of homegrown designers both established and emerging is not only finding success in Canada, but forging a national aesthetic based on attention to materials, robust lines, cheeky humour and a marked eco-consciousness.”
-Danny Sinopoli, The Globe and Mail

“…individuality and singularity implies rarity, which breeds desire”
-Sophie Lovell

Abandoned Bonsai

Agriculture Canada, shelterbeltsAgriculture Canada provided free tree seedlings to farms for over 80 years. Nearly every farmstead on the prairies took advantage of that service and planted the free trees around their houses and in shelterbelts. Years later, many of the homesteads were abandoned and often the houses were torn down.  But, very often, the trees remained, usually in a square, still sheltering the space where families lived and grew. If you are driving down a road on the prairies and see a patch of maples, caraganas, lilacs or spruce, chances are, they are the remnants of a farmstead or old schoolyard. Although gnarled and broken, with gaps in the foliage and dead branches on the trunks, those trees are living reminders of our heritage. They were observers and participants in our history and I felt I could pay some homage to them in my piece.

The concept of Abandoned Bonsai is a miniature tree that had been nurtured and cared for for decades by someone with patience and skill. For whatever reason, the tree was then passed on to someone with less interest and/or skill in tending bonsai and, as a result, the tree has started to show its age.

Abandoned Bonsai  is made from deer and elk antler with green florist wire as the needles. All antler surfaces are textured to resemble tree bark. 900 bundles of wire, comprising 18,000 individual spikes adorn the branches of the sculpture. The piece is presented upon a poplar wood base utilizing the natural edges. The “roots” of the tree have been carved to hug the flowing wood contours.

36cm W x 26cm D x 11cm H
14.4″w x 10.5″D x 4.4″H

Posted in Flowers, What's New

Antler: Walking Stick

purple, style, cane, nannyberryWalking sticks used to be a common accoutrement for people when they went out. Of course, people walked more often. Now, walking sticks seem to be reserved for hikers and are either high tech or very rustic and masculine.

This walking stick is designed for a woman who does not want to have to compromise her style. A single large rose is carved from a moose antler and mounted on a polished stick of Nannyberry. The antler has a natural purplish color that is complimented by a purplish stain on the wood. The end piece has detachable rubber and pointed brass tips. The wooden part can be shortened if desired to cane length.

 

4cm diameter x 9cmH
1.5”diameter x 3.5”H
length: 48” (122cm) or less

 

Antler: Gothic Bonsai

handmade antler flower carvingGothic novels abound with images of tree branches clutching at a person’s clothes and roots tripping a person, usually during a ‘dark and stormy night’. I wondered what such a gothic tree would look like if trained into a bonsai. The branches of this tree end in skeletal fingers, with the 213 leaves protruding from the joints. The motif is extended to the roots which each end in carpal bones that clutch at the base. The whole piece is skewed as if grown in a region with frequent winds from one direction. The tree is carved from deer, moose and elk antler and is rooted in a base of yellow cedar.

Bonsai have always been popular with gardeners and plant enthusiasts. In Victorian times, a carved bonsai is the kind of artwork that would be collected by a gentleman for display in his study, office or library.

This is an excellent example of handmade antler art made by INAKA. This contemporary design handcrafted antler flower carving would be an asset to any home. High quality custom designed handcrafted antler sculpture is a reflection of the owner as well as of the artist.

46cm W x 28cm D x 55cm H
18”W x 11”D x 21.5”H

 

Posted in Flowers, What's New